'Coins for Caring' event notches record-setting collection

Dec 17 2013 - 9:19am

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Boy Scout troop 534 in North Ogden set a record for collecting coins Saturday. The fundraising drive, called “Coins for Caring,” helped raise money for The American Red Cross, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints humanitarian fund, and families devastated by the recent typhoon in the Philippines.
Boy Scout troop 534 in North Ogden set a record for collecting coins Saturday. The fundraising drive, called “Coins for Caring,” helped raise money for The American Red Cross, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints humanitarian fund, and families devastated by the recent typhoon in the Philippines.

NORTH OGDEN -- Not only did a local Boy Scout troop set a world record on Saturday, they raised money for a good cause.

Troop 534 organized a fundraising drive called "Coins for Caring." The service project was held to collect money for The American Red Cross, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints humanitarian fund, families devastated by the recent typhoon in the Philippines and to try and set a Guinness Book of World Records for the most coins collected in a day.

Because there has never been a record for a days worth of coin collecting, the troop, consisting of 14 scouts, will be listed in the book whether it raises a dime or $1,000, said troop leader, Dan Murdock.

"Because it's not yet a record, they will set it today," he said. "They are really excited about that. Even if they get just a little bit of money, they'll set the record."

The trrop ended up raising $858.92.

The event was held in two different North Ogden parking lots where the boys sat in the back of trucks and collected jars of money and other loose change by community members.

Scout Johnpaul Ryan said he brought his own pocket change.

"I'm not sure how much is there," he said. "We have a big jar that we throw our change in, so that's what I'm giving."

In addition, a member of the troop's LDS home ward, knows a family who suffered from the typhoon, Murdock said.

"We are going to be helping the family as well as others as much as we can," he said. "I have a son serving a mission there right now and he writes to tell us about the situation. In fact, the place where he is just barely got their power back."

Murdock said after discussing the situation in the Philippines with the boys, they all jumped on board, wanting to help.

"They're a great group of kids and they really wanted to think of way to help," Murdock said. "Everyone has loose change somewhere, whether it's in a jar or under the couch cushions. The boys thought that would be a great way to ask for help from their community."

Johnpaul said the folks in the Philippines have been through a lot, so it wouldn't hurt him to sit out in the cold for a couple of hours.

"It's for a great cause and it's a great way for people to spend their change and put it to good use," he said.

 

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